What It Means to Follow

To follow is to, out of willingness to subject oneself, make accessible a mode of thought, person, or other formation of coagulated data.  The meaning of this is to partake in some kind of collectivity, indirectly or directly. Following a social media celebrity on Instagram is the act of collectively receiving data, and likewise of receiving collective data. This data is intertwined with other sets, and itself follows modes of presentation. Even doing something “new” is reactionary. New is in this sense fills the expanse of a clearly set-out void, one that has likely been addressed already. It’s a pictorial rejection of patriarchy, a touching rendering of overcoming a hardship, a taunt in the masked face of an illusive authority.

Follow photo by Gianne De Jesus

Continuous streams of imagery, toiling or fruitful, identifiably encroach, leak, or are welcomed fully into our span of media intake. Some take the thing, some their interpretation of the thing, and some understand the illusion of the thing. All things, these things, live in a mode – a revenue of a set compilation of social probabilities. Even seeming outliers of this equation have a traceable congestion of qualifiable factors.

Follow photo by Gianne De Jesus

To follow is to safely assure the brain of a consistent mode, consistent even in its inconsistency. It is to play viewer of a palpable iteration of continuously rearranged factors that can go undetected to the eye that seeks nothing other than the sheen, the glimmer, the thing. Emission of data, and immersion into these data streams play nearly identical roles in the formation of mass function fathomably riddled and ridden with probability.